another look into black women are the most disrespected people on the fucking planet.

iridessence:

mimicryisnotmastery:

onnaollie:

black women get called angry every fucking day but you don’t see us out here shooting up folks at work or schools or bringing kitchen knives to stab people.

nope.

but we’re universally labeled ANGRY BLACK WOMEN.

meanwhile white boys are making youtube videos about WHY DON’T GIRLS WANNA HAVE SEX WITH ME and doing mass shootings. we ain’t gonna hear WHITE MEN ARE ANGRY AND VIOLENT. not at all.

where is the lie

no where in this post

(via krisbme)

mrcheyl:

Nicki Minaj - Anaconda [x]

(via feralfeline420)

No good result can come from any investigation which refuses to consider the facts. A conclusion that is based upon a presumption instead of the best evidence is unworthy of a moment”s consideration. The lynching record, as it is compiled from day to day by unbiased, reliable, and responsible public journals, should be the basis of every investigation which seeks to discover the cause and suggest the remedy for lynching. The excuses of lynchers and the specious pleas of their apologists should be considered in the light of the record, which they invariably misrepresent or ignore.

The Christian and moral forces of the nation should insist that misrepresentation should have no place in the discussion of this all important question, that the figures of the lynching record should be allowed to plead, trumpet-tongued, in defense of the slandered dead, that the silence of concession be broken, and that truth, swift-winged and courageous, summon this nation to do its duty to exalt justice and preserve inviolate the sacredness of human life.

Ida B. Wells Source: Independent, May 16, 1901.

113 years later, why is Ida B. Wells still painfully correct? 

#BlackLivesMatter

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

(via missymissydee)

This list is not exhaustive or comprehensive; it is a selected list on the subject with an attempt to introduce our readers  to the scholarship  on Haitian Vodou,  and the nature of Haitian Vodou religion and spirituality. The list is divided in three parts: a) Books, b) Online articles/essays, c) Online interviews and documentaries. As time permits, we will add more resources to the list. 

“For me, motivation is this horrible, scary game where I try to make myself do something while I actively avoid doing it. If I win, I have to do something I don’t want to do. If I lose, I’m one step closer to ruining my entire life.”
— Allie Brosh, Hyperbole and a Half (via quotes-shape-us)

(via curiousgeorgiana)

brownskindama:

mobettahues:
hey, i’m yani.i do art.i write things.i make music.
click here if you’d like to listen.

YO WHY ME AND HER GOT THE EXACT SAME HAIR THOUGH.
FORREAL IF I HAD DYED MY WHOLE HAIR THIS COLOR THIS IS WHAT IT WOULD LOOK LIKE 
WOOOOOOOOW  brownskindama:

mobettahues:
hey, i’m yani.i do art.i write things.i make music.
click here if you’d like to listen.

YO WHY ME AND HER GOT THE EXACT SAME HAIR THOUGH.
FORREAL IF I HAD DYED MY WHOLE HAIR THIS COLOR THIS IS WHAT IT WOULD LOOK LIKE 
WOOOOOOOOW  brownskindama:

mobettahues:
hey, i’m yani.i do art.i write things.i make music.
click here if you’d like to listen.

YO WHY ME AND HER GOT THE EXACT SAME HAIR THOUGH.
FORREAL IF I HAD DYED MY WHOLE HAIR THIS COLOR THIS IS WHAT IT WOULD LOOK LIKE 
WOOOOOOOOW  brownskindama:

mobettahues:
hey, i’m yani.i do art.i write things.i make music.
click here if you’d like to listen.

YO WHY ME AND HER GOT THE EXACT SAME HAIR THOUGH.
FORREAL IF I HAD DYED MY WHOLE HAIR THIS COLOR THIS IS WHAT IT WOULD LOOK LIKE 
WOOOOOOOOW 

brownskindama:

mobettahues:

hey, i’m yani.

i do art.
i write things.
i make music.

click here if you’d like to listen.

YO WHY ME AND HER GOT THE EXACT SAME HAIR THOUGH.

FORREAL IF I HAD DYED MY WHOLE HAIR THIS COLOR THIS IS WHAT IT WOULD LOOK LIKE 

WOOOOOOOOW 

gynocraticgrrl:

"Moreover, popular narratives about the end of [legally sanctioned black, U.S slavery] erase[s] the agency of black people themselves.
And, I suppose we can say that if Lincoln did not really free the slaves, he was shrewd enough to recognize that the only hope of winning the civil war resided in pre-aiding the opportunity for black people to fight for their own freedom.”

Angela Y. Davis, Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies (UCLA-Santa Cruz): 150 Years Later, Abolition in the 21st Century [March 27, 2013] 

gynocraticgrrl:

"Moreover, popular narratives about the end of [legally sanctioned black, U.S slavery] erase[s] the agency of black people themselves.
And, I suppose we can say that if Lincoln did not really free the slaves, he was shrewd enough to recognize that the only hope of winning the civil war resided in pre-aiding the opportunity for black people to fight for their own freedom.”

Angela Y. Davis, Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies (UCLA-Santa Cruz): 150 Years Later, Abolition in the 21st Century [March 27, 2013] 

gynocraticgrrl:

"Moreover, popular narratives about the end of [legally sanctioned black, U.S slavery] erase[s] the agency of black people themselves.
And, I suppose we can say that if Lincoln did not really free the slaves, he was shrewd enough to recognize that the only hope of winning the civil war resided in pre-aiding the opportunity for black people to fight for their own freedom.”

Angela Y. Davis, Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies (UCLA-Santa Cruz): 150 Years Later, Abolition in the 21st Century [March 27, 2013] 

gynocraticgrrl:

"Moreover, popular narratives about the end of [legally sanctioned black, U.S slavery] erase[s] the agency of black people themselves.
And, I suppose we can say that if Lincoln did not really free the slaves, he was shrewd enough to recognize that the only hope of winning the civil war resided in pre-aiding the opportunity for black people to fight for their own freedom.”

Angela Y. Davis, Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies (UCLA-Santa Cruz): 150 Years Later, Abolition in the 21st Century [March 27, 2013]

gynocraticgrrl:

"Moreover, popular narratives about the end of [legally sanctioned black, U.S slavery] erase[s] the agency of black people themselves.

And, I suppose we can say that if Lincoln did not really free the slaves, he was shrewd enough to recognize that the only hope of winning the civil war resided in pre-aiding the opportunity for black people to fight for their own freedom.”

Angela Y. Davis, Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies (UCLA-Santa Cruz): 150 Years Later, Abolition in the 21st Century [March 27, 2013]

(via strugglingtobeheard)