i just remembered that i won a rap battle once. 😂😂😂

keondillon:

Channeling… Photo Cred: Grae.

liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!! liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!! liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!! liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!! liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!! liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.
Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!!

liligiworld:

six selfies… thingy. Tagged by the lovely munnarita who I kinda gotta secret e-crush on. Here y’all go. My weird self on display.

Tagging talesofthestarshipregeneration so-treu if y’all feel so inclined, that is.

oh shit you cute as hell!!!!!

Q

Anonymous asked:

Where do Afro Palestinians fit in with the struggle? They also face racism from other Palestinians and are often not considered Palestinian enough nor that they have the right to be in the land despite many of them being in the country since the Islamic conquest. What is their position and who is rallying for their rights?

A

ard-al-burtuqal:

First, Afro-Palestinian have always fitted in the Palestinian anti-colonial struggle for national liberation they participate in resistance and mobilizations against the occupation. The first Palestinian woman to organize a commando operation in “israel” was Fatima Bernawi and she is Afro-Palestinian.I don’t know where you got that Afro-Palestinians “don’t have the right to be on the land” they are indigenous to the land just as any Palestinian. I suggest you look at these links to resources i provided below to learn more about the community and their struggles and aspirations. 

Video: Ali Jiddah Afro-Palestinian activist from Jerusalem 

Afro-Jerusalmite Society: An Afro-Palestinian organization based in Jerusalem 

Article: Black, Proud and Palestinian

Photo Portraits: Portraits of Afro-Palestinians from Jerusalem and Jericho 

Articles about Afro-Palestinians in Gaza:

Here & Here 

Darg Team Palestinian Hip-Hop group group from Gaza that is made up of Afro-Palestinian members (The second article above talks about them)

Reema Morgan Afro-Palestinian singer from Gaza

The crisis of solidarity: Using ‘’their plight” to score political points by Budour Hassan 

This is a great article although Budour discusses Eritrean and South Sudani refugees in “israel” she also writes about Afro-Palestinians.

You can read about Fatima Bernawi here beginning on page 10:

Daughters of Palestine Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement by Amal Kawar

Article about Majed Abu Maraheel the first Palestinian to compete in the Olympics back in Atlanta in 1996 who is Afro-Palestinian.

michaelaross:

The First African-American Detectives, The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case, and the Fate of Reconstruction

When police departments in the mid-twentieth-century appointed African-American detectives, the nation took note.  Through countless books, movies, and television shows, detectives had become the most glamorous figures in law enforcement, and the appointment of black detectives—first in the North and then in the South—was seen as a sign of a transforming society. Sidney Poitier’s portrayal of Philadelphia homicide detective Virgil Tibbs in the 1967 film In the Heat of the Night became iconic. But few commentators noted at the time that the trailblazing African- American detectives of the Civil Rights Era were not the first black detectives in American History. That honor goes to the black “special officers,” as detectives were often called, who served in a handful of cities in the South during Reconstruction.  In Reconstruction-era New Orleans, for example, John Baptiste Jourdain, Jordan Noble, and other black detectives investigated high profile crimes including the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case of 1870.

Until the mid-1840s, American urban police forces did not employ detectives at all; before then, the role of policemen, night watchmen, and town constables was to prevent crimes, not to solve them. Cities usually depended on common citizens to identify criminals. Even with the rise of professional policing in the 1830s, officers focused their energies on prevention and made most arrests based on evidence that witnesses had voluntarily brought forth. After Boston introduced the first detective squad in 1846, other American cities, including New Orleans, followed suit, and detectives soon became celebrated figures. Stories, both real and fictional, of whip-smart sleuths deciphering clues, using disguise, spotting telltale signs, and outsmarting wily criminals captured the American imagination. True crime tabloids like the National Police Gazette, as well as the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, helped propel the national obsession with detective work.

But until Reconstruction, all police detectives in the United States
had been white. Even in 1870, police departments in the North still had not hired black patrolmen, let alone detectives. The Boston force would not add a black officer until 1878; in New York City, the ranks remained all-white until 1911. But in the South, five cities employed black officers. Reconstruction, it seemed, had brought real change; only a few years earlier, the idea of a black man serving on a southern police force in any capacity would have been unthinkable. But in 1870 in New Orleans, black detectives followed leads, interrogated white and black witnesses, and used their deductive skills in efforts to solve sensational crimes like the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case.  More was at stake, of course, than simply solving crimes.  If they succeeded, black detectives could help convince skeptical whites that biracial government could work.  If they failed, however, they would arm the critics who demanded the restoration of white supremacy.

(via howtobeterrell)

“There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.”
— Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (New York: HarperCollins, 1996), 87. (Originally published 1942)

(via howtobeterrell)

hersheywrites:

black—lamb:

these photos were taken earlier this year when I attended school in Tennessee (my 4th year to be exact)
I don’t know if you can tell but I was very sad at the time…
Sad is actually an understatement… I had actually never thought about suicide before going to a religious school… But it’s just something about being surrounded by people who care about everyone else but the ones they are supposed to care about.. I never would have guessed I would be sleeping in my car and in hotels all while trying to get my education at a place that literally hated me… Or the idea of what I represented.
This piece, “Overhead” was one done in response to being told “create a work about how you are feeling”
At the time I felt so empty and lonely that it physically hurt…
"Overhead" represents the idea of a dark cloud overtaking a persons’ life… How the feelings of sadness can have a physical weight of it’s own… A presence if you will…
I spent 5 days/nights (even after the piece was due) to finish this room sized installation. It consisted of over 500 fishing lines attached to a 15 x 20 ft grid and pounds of scrap bubble wrap … I did not finish the piece on time even when I asked for an extension… I just wanted to do my best..in my mind, it would all pay off…
It didn’t. My professor: a racist homophobic sexist conservative man took it as his opportunity to put me in my place… To break me… At the end of the year he failed me….an advanced sculpture student who had always made A’s and who had received scholarships for my work…
Fast forward to now… I wish I could have told the person I was a couple months ago that everything was going to be ok…
I’m now in NYC. Things are not perfect but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.
Tennessee broke me… and even thinking about “Overhead” brings back terrible feelings and resentment… But I’m so thankful it did. I was meant to be pushed away from that place.
I’m free.


funny that’s exactly how i feel about Tennessee……. hersheywrites:

black—lamb:

these photos were taken earlier this year when I attended school in Tennessee (my 4th year to be exact)
I don’t know if you can tell but I was very sad at the time…
Sad is actually an understatement… I had actually never thought about suicide before going to a religious school… But it’s just something about being surrounded by people who care about everyone else but the ones they are supposed to care about.. I never would have guessed I would be sleeping in my car and in hotels all while trying to get my education at a place that literally hated me… Or the idea of what I represented.
This piece, “Overhead” was one done in response to being told “create a work about how you are feeling”
At the time I felt so empty and lonely that it physically hurt…
"Overhead" represents the idea of a dark cloud overtaking a persons’ life… How the feelings of sadness can have a physical weight of it’s own… A presence if you will…
I spent 5 days/nights (even after the piece was due) to finish this room sized installation. It consisted of over 500 fishing lines attached to a 15 x 20 ft grid and pounds of scrap bubble wrap … I did not finish the piece on time even when I asked for an extension… I just wanted to do my best..in my mind, it would all pay off…
It didn’t. My professor: a racist homophobic sexist conservative man took it as his opportunity to put me in my place… To break me… At the end of the year he failed me….an advanced sculpture student who had always made A’s and who had received scholarships for my work…
Fast forward to now… I wish I could have told the person I was a couple months ago that everything was going to be ok…
I’m now in NYC. Things are not perfect but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.
Tennessee broke me… and even thinking about “Overhead” brings back terrible feelings and resentment… But I’m so thankful it did. I was meant to be pushed away from that place.
I’m free.


funny that’s exactly how i feel about Tennessee……. hersheywrites:

black—lamb:

these photos were taken earlier this year when I attended school in Tennessee (my 4th year to be exact)
I don’t know if you can tell but I was very sad at the time…
Sad is actually an understatement… I had actually never thought about suicide before going to a religious school… But it’s just something about being surrounded by people who care about everyone else but the ones they are supposed to care about.. I never would have guessed I would be sleeping in my car and in hotels all while trying to get my education at a place that literally hated me… Or the idea of what I represented.
This piece, “Overhead” was one done in response to being told “create a work about how you are feeling”
At the time I felt so empty and lonely that it physically hurt…
"Overhead" represents the idea of a dark cloud overtaking a persons’ life… How the feelings of sadness can have a physical weight of it’s own… A presence if you will…
I spent 5 days/nights (even after the piece was due) to finish this room sized installation. It consisted of over 500 fishing lines attached to a 15 x 20 ft grid and pounds of scrap bubble wrap … I did not finish the piece on time even when I asked for an extension… I just wanted to do my best..in my mind, it would all pay off…
It didn’t. My professor: a racist homophobic sexist conservative man took it as his opportunity to put me in my place… To break me… At the end of the year he failed me….an advanced sculpture student who had always made A’s and who had received scholarships for my work…
Fast forward to now… I wish I could have told the person I was a couple months ago that everything was going to be ok…
I’m now in NYC. Things are not perfect but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.
Tennessee broke me… and even thinking about “Overhead” brings back terrible feelings and resentment… But I’m so thankful it did. I was meant to be pushed away from that place.
I’m free.


funny that’s exactly how i feel about Tennessee……. hersheywrites:

black—lamb:

these photos were taken earlier this year when I attended school in Tennessee (my 4th year to be exact)
I don’t know if you can tell but I was very sad at the time…
Sad is actually an understatement… I had actually never thought about suicide before going to a religious school… But it’s just something about being surrounded by people who care about everyone else but the ones they are supposed to care about.. I never would have guessed I would be sleeping in my car and in hotels all while trying to get my education at a place that literally hated me… Or the idea of what I represented.
This piece, “Overhead” was one done in response to being told “create a work about how you are feeling”
At the time I felt so empty and lonely that it physically hurt…
"Overhead" represents the idea of a dark cloud overtaking a persons’ life… How the feelings of sadness can have a physical weight of it’s own… A presence if you will…
I spent 5 days/nights (even after the piece was due) to finish this room sized installation. It consisted of over 500 fishing lines attached to a 15 x 20 ft grid and pounds of scrap bubble wrap … I did not finish the piece on time even when I asked for an extension… I just wanted to do my best..in my mind, it would all pay off…
It didn’t. My professor: a racist homophobic sexist conservative man took it as his opportunity to put me in my place… To break me… At the end of the year he failed me….an advanced sculpture student who had always made A’s and who had received scholarships for my work…
Fast forward to now… I wish I could have told the person I was a couple months ago that everything was going to be ok…
I’m now in NYC. Things are not perfect but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.
Tennessee broke me… and even thinking about “Overhead” brings back terrible feelings and resentment… But I’m so thankful it did. I was meant to be pushed away from that place.
I’m free.


funny that’s exactly how i feel about Tennessee…….

hersheywrites:

black—lamb:

these photos were taken earlier this year when I attended school in Tennessee (my 4th year to be exact)

I don’t know if you can tell but I was very sad at the time…

Sad is actually an understatement… I had actually never thought about suicide before going to a religious school… But it’s just something about being surrounded by people who care about everyone else but the ones they are supposed to care about.. I never would have guessed I would be sleeping in my car and in hotels all while trying to get my education at a place that literally hated me… Or the idea of what I represented.

This piece, “Overhead” was one done in response to being told “create a work about how you are feeling”

At the time I felt so empty and lonely that it physically hurt…

"Overhead" represents the idea of a dark cloud overtaking a persons’ life… How the feelings of sadness can have a physical weight of it’s own… A presence if you will…

I spent 5 days/nights (even after the piece was due) to finish this room sized installation. It consisted of over 500 fishing lines attached to a 15 x 20 ft grid and pounds of scrap bubble wrap …
I did not finish the piece on time even when I asked for an extension… I just wanted to do my best..in my mind, it would all pay off…

It didn’t. My professor: a racist homophobic sexist conservative man took it as his opportunity to put me in my place… To break me… At the end of the year he failed me….an advanced sculpture student who had always made A’s and who had received scholarships for my work…

Fast forward to now… I wish I could have told the person I was a couple months ago that everything was going to be ok…

I’m now in NYC. Things are not perfect but I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

Tennessee broke me… and even thinking about “Overhead” brings back terrible feelings and resentment… But I’m so thankful it did. I was meant to be pushed away from that place.

I’m free.

funny that’s exactly how i feel about Tennessee…….

(via limchoylee)